Photography

Perfect Vision


Artists who seek perfection in everything are those who cannot attain it in anything

It is good to remember that one of our goals in life is to not be perfect. If life is about experimenting, experiencing, and learning, then to be imperfect is a prerequisite. Life becomes much more interesting once we let go of our quest for perfection and aspire for imperfection instead. This doesn’t mean that we don’t strive to be our best, but to simply accept that there is no such thing as perfection.  Perfection may happen in a moment, but it will not last because it is an impermanent state.

In spite of this, many of us are in the habit of trying to be perfect. One way to ease ourselves out of this tendency is to look at our lives and notice that no one is judging us to see whether or not we are perfect. Sometimes, perfectionism is a holdover from our childhood—an ideal we inherited from a demanding parent. Now that we are the adults, we can choose to let go of the need to perform for someone else’s approval. Similarly, we can choose to experience the universe as a place where we are free to be imperfect, where we can begin to take ourselves less seriously and have more fun.

This is another rusty gem from the grounds of Bernardo Winery – oh, did we mention that they have spectacular vintages as well?  Rusty things are just fun to explore and shoot. Here we used a Nikkor 105mm fixed focal length lens (that also doubles as a Macro) allowing us to get up close and personal with our favourite form of oxidation. Having a tripod for Macro work is not a luxury but absolutely essential. The closer one gets, the more critical the focussing becomes and hence, the stability of the camera. In the “old days” of SLR cameras and film, viewfinders often had split image focussing and other optical aides to get that tack sharp image. Now, we always take off the Auto-Focus feature and focus by eye and forget about the camera making choices for us. Also, using a remote shutter release, wired or infra-red, helps minimize vibrations when releasing the shutter. If you want even less potential vibration, you can use the Mirror-Up feature after composing and before shooting (yes, the movement of the mirror to expose the sensor causes the camera to shake).

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7 responses

  1. Qui est parfait ? J’ai mes défauts et ils sont une partie de moi… N’est-ce pas ?

    June 7, 2012 at 1:14 pm

  2. did you use the mirror up or not?

    June 7, 2012 at 5:58 pm

    • Not for this shot – it does help with vibration though! Thanks for the comments and visit

      June 8, 2012 at 5:08 am

      • i almost never use every precaution either.

        June 8, 2012 at 11:30 am

  3. That is a perfect B&W image… love the contrast :)

    June 7, 2012 at 9:34 pm

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