Photography

NYC After Dark


This is a bit of Fish Eye action from Manhattan. This City never stops – the energy persists 24hrs. We chose a distortion technique called “Fish Eye” as well as long exposures (to get light trails) to convey what a visitor may perceive in New York City at 3am. Jaw dropping!

In photography, a fish eye lens is a wide-angle lens that takes in a broad, panoramic and somewhat hemispherical image. Originally developed for use in meteorology to study cloud formation and called “whole-sky lenses”, fish eye lenses quickly became popular in general photography for their unique, distorted appearance. They are often used by photographers shooting broad landscapes to suggest the curve of the Earth.

The focal lengths of fish eye lenses are between 8 mm and 10 mm for circular images, and 15–16 mm for full-frame images. For digital cameras using smaller electronic imagers such as 1/4″ and 1/3″ format CCD or CMOS sensors, the focal length of “miniature” fish eye lenses can be as short as 1 to 2mm.

All the ultra-wide angle lenses suffer from some amount of barrel distortion. While this can easily be corrected for moderately wide angles of view, ultra-wide angle lenses with rectilinear angles of view greater than 90 degrees are difficult to design.

This is one of the most awesome places to visit, day or night! Come get a bite of The Big Apple!

4 responses

  1. Love the distortion in this.

    November 14, 2011 at 8:27 am

  2. Love me some fisheye photos! Cool perspective and I like that this shot is at night – manhattan is a cool place to grab some street photos!

    November 17, 2011 at 3:09 pm

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